Harry Reid never lost the boxer’s advantage

The political landscape is littered with those who underestimated the late Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada.

People forget that Reid was a boxer, a United States Capitol police officer, and headed the Nevada GamingĀ  all before joining the Senate in 1987. He defeated Tea Party darling Sharron Angle by six points in the landslide Republican year of 2010. That was an election in which Republicans were sure they would not only flog Reid but also take over the Senate. In 1998, Reid defeated then-Rep. John Ensign, Republican of Nevada, by just 401 votes.

Reid’s thin voice betrayed his steely exterior. For example, hardly anyone could hear Reid speak about the din in the Capitol Rotunda during a Congressional Gold Medal presentation to golf icon Jack Nicklaus. But that soft tone of voice didn’t mean Reid wasn’t going to fight practically anyone. In a 2008 session with the press, Reid scolded journalists for not grasping the nuances of a parliamentary tactic on energy legislation. Reid warned the scribes .

Minutes later, another reporter was still unclear on Reid’s procedural plan. The Nevada Democrat asked the reporter if he and asked if he was hard of hearing. Reid chided. Even visitors to the United States Capitol were not immune to Reid’s resentment. In the summer, because of the high humidity and hot weather here, you could literally smell tourists coming into the Capitol,” Reid said during the 2008 opening of the US Capitol Visitor Center.

A master shaker, Reid got under the skin of then-Senate Majority LeaderĀ  R-Tenn., In November 2004. Reid took to the Senate floor and designed a closed session to debate the controversial intelligence that led to the war in Iraq. Frist, the then majority leader, controlled the floor. But Reid kidnapped all of that. The political landscape is littered with those who underestimated the late Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada.

People forget that Reid was a boxer, a United States Capitol police officer, and headed the Nevada Gaming Commission, all before joining the Senate in 1987. He defeated Tea Party darling Sharron Angle by six points in the landslide Republican year of 2010. That was an election in which Republicans were sure they would not only flog Reid but also take over the Senate. In 1998, John Ensign, Republican of Nevada, by just 401 votes.

Reid’s thin voice betrayed his steely exterior. For example, hardly anyone could hear Reid speak about the din in the Capitol Rotunda during a Congressional Gold Medal presentation to golf icon Jack Nicklaus. But that soft tone of voice didn’t mean Reid wasn’t going to fight practically anyone. In a 2008 session with the press, Reid scolded journalists for not grasping the nuances of a parliamentary tactic on energy legislation. Reid warned the scribes .